Bernie Sanders wants to 'cut the United States prison population in half'


Senator Bernie Sanders has stated that he wants to "cut the United States prison population in half" according to a report on The Hill. Bernie Sanders' criminal justice reform ideas also include ending minimum sentences and trying to do something for people who can't afford to make bail payments.

Despite Trump's efforts with criminal justice reform, Sanders appears to think his plan is better. He seems to base it on efforts to "root out institutional racism and corporate profiteering."

"If we stand together, we can eliminate private prisons and detention centers. No more profiteering from locking people up," Sanders will say in a speech unveiling the plan, according to a statement from his campaign. "If we stand together we can end the disastrous 'war on drugs.' If we stand together we can end cash bail.  No more keeping people in jail because they’re too poor. If we stand together we can enact real police department reform and prosecute police brutality. If we stand together, there is nothing, nothing, nothing that we cannot accomplish."

The Hill reports that Sanders' plan will go for a complete overhaul of the criminal justice system, ban private prisons, legalize marijuana, expunge convictions for marijuana-related crimes. Sanders will also target "banning cash bail and civil asset forfeiture. His initiative would also focus on reinstating a federal parole system and "investing in youth diversion programs and alternatives to the court and prison system."

Sanders said during an interview with The Associated Press that there's a lot of people locked up who are suffering with various forums of illness. “These should be treated as health issues, not from a criminal perspective.”

The Bernie Sanders criminal justice reform will also get rid of the death penalty and solitary confinement.

Of course, these ideas will all need to go through the proper process to be approved.

Bernie Sanders is one of the presidential candidates calling for prisons to allow imprisoned felons to vote.

"I think that is absolutely the direction we should go," Sanders said at a town hall in Muscatine, Iowa, in April. "In my state, what we do is separate. You’re paying a price, you committed a crime, you’re in jail. That's bad. But you’re still living in American society and you have a right to vote.