Here's a Chart that Donald Trump should plaster everywhere

The graph is the average unemployment rate in the first 35 months of the presidents for the past five decades. President Donald Trump's administration is a 50-year low at 3.9 percent. The next best employment statistic recorded since President George W. Bush' first term which was at 5.5. The statistic comes with the fact that the wages of American workers are rising for the first time in years. 

The "Deep Dive" panel discusses this statistic and how it will be a challenge to Democratic hopefuls. 

According to James Freeman, assistant editor of the Wall Street Journal's editorial page, "Workers' wages have lately been rising faster than the salaries of their bosses. It pretty much knocks out the inequality argument.. It appears the Trump era has been reducing income inequality." He also adds "There needs to be, I think, a new Democratic economic message. They're basically giving the same talking points from 2015 and 2016, when we talk about the average person's wages are stagnating and the middle class doesn't have the same opportunity." 

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Fox Business Host Charles Payne commented "The first time it happened was September 2018, and it's happened every single month, except one, were blue-collar workers', not supervisory workers' wages have grown faster than their supervisors'. It's amazing." 

It doesn't stop there. The Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia released a report that shows manufacturing activity in the U.S. Mid-Atlantic region that has rebounded from a slump in the second-half of 2019. 

Fox Business host Elizabeth MacDonald agreed, stating "For the first time in 26 years, according to census, and [Bureau of Labor Statistics] data, we have seen income gains in all Metropolitan areas. Now, we've also seen 45 states seeing their state tax revenue back before pre-recession levels, according to Pew Charitable Trusts."

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