FOIA reveals McCabe flip-flopped, later apologized for changing his story


A recent report released discusses how Andrew McCabe, former FBI deputy director, had 'flip-flopped' on information he provided and changed his story about the origins of a Wall Street Journal story during the 2016 presidential campaign. He later said sorry for changing his story, which some could consider being a source of bad information. Or, just being a (insert something you like calling people here).

McCabe has since faced a lit amount of hot criticism, with some of it coming from both sides of the political spectrum. He also faces possible criminal prosecution.

Betsy Swan and Sam Brodey teamed up to piece together the wicked report on McCabe's flippy-floppy in an article for the Daily Beast.

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Former FBI deputy director Andrew McCabe faced scorching criticism and potential criminal prosecution for changing his story about a conversation he had with a Wall Street Journal reporter. Now newly released interview transcripts show McCabe expressed remorse to internal FBI investigators when they pressed him on the about-face. 

They report that the FBI actually released the documents requested in a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request that was filed by a group called Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW). The information revealed sheds more light on the situation and how Flippy-Floppy McCabe was involved, not to mention the agents who reacted to it and investigated it.

So what happened?

Long story short (go to Daily Beast for the full account, I only give the short versions here)...

Wall Street Journal posted this story. It was about the FBI investigation that involved Hillary Clinton and some internal talks with senior FBI officials.

It was a leak.

It got some people mad.

Those people interviewed McCabe the same day Trump fired James Comey, on May 9, 2017 - but McCabe was interviewed for a different media leak, although they just happened to ask him about the one posted on WSJ. Figured, why not, right?

McCabe answered.

Months later, McCabe changed his story.

On Aug. 18, FBI officials met with McCabe in an attempt to work through what they said was “conflicting information” they had gathered about the possible leak to the Journal.

“I need to know from you,” an agent said he told McCabe in a sit-down meeting, “did you authorize this article? Were you aware of it? Did you authorize it?” 

McCabe then looked at the story he had reviewed months earlier. 

The FBI investigator described his response this way: “And as nice as could be, he said, yep. Yep I did.”

The investigator then said that “things had suddenly changed 180 degrees with this.” The interviewers stopped taking notes on what McCabe was saying, and the agent indicated their view of McCabe had changed: He was no longer a witness or victim. “In our business, we stop and say, look, now we’re getting into an area for due process,” the agent said.

At this point an agent knows what's going on, but doesn't really get irritated about it at first. But eventually, they do. The agent even uses a "frustrated tone," as stated in the Daily Beast. Who wouldn't be mad? When someone changes their story and it effects you somehow, then obviously anyone with a working brain would be frustrated.

“I remember saying to him, at, I said, sir, you understand that we’ve put a lot of work into this based on what you told us,” the agent said. “I mean, and I even said, long nights and weekends working on this, trying to find out who amongst your ranks of trusted people would, would do something like that. And he kind of just looked down, kind of nodded, and said yeah I’m sorry.”

"I'm sorry" is something you say when you bump into someone at the grocery store because you weren't looking and you slammed shopping carts by accident. "I'm sorry" is not something you say when you're Andrew McCabe and talking to agents or officials in a world of politics.

I won't even bother to tell you what McCabe's excuse was that his lawyer gave. It's pathetic.


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