By Frank Lea
Posted September 12, 2017

I recently watched a video of a high school girl viciously punch a teacher in the face, try to kick her, and just repeatedly punch the woman. The teacher didn't fight back. The teacher barely defended herself as she walked away and told the student that she wouldn't be suspended (from work) over her. I don't know what happened before this fight. I don't know if the teacher deserved it. I don't know any of the backstory. All I have is a video of a teacher approaching a student and barely getting a few words in before the student pummels her like a Conor McGregor sparring partner. (See update at the end. I don't think that's a teacher)

Did you ever want to punch one of your teachers? I didn't. I knew better because I was taught to respect adults and follow directions as a kid. While I didn't always follow the directions, I certainly didn't mouth off to the adults or attack them viciously like the video you'll see below.  We were scared of our parents when we were kids. Not because our parents would beat the daylights out of us, but because we simply knew better. We knew that if we got in trouble at school that we were getting in trouble again at home.  What did that mean? It was always one of several things, or all of them, depending on how old we were or how severely we were in trouble.

My punishment at home meant I was grounded. I was NOT allowed to go outside. We didn't have smart phones as kids, so we weren't losers walking around with our heads down staring at a screen and not talking to anyone we're sitting next to. We were real kids. We rode bikes, played sports, shot toy guns at each other. We did real stuff that required us to look up from a screen and remember we're in a real world and not part of a virtual reality. When we were kids, we caught each other during games of "Freedom" or "tag" and we didn't catch fake Pokemon on a screen. That doesn't mean we didn't get our share of video games in. We were all addicted to Nintendo and Sega Genesis, but that was something we did when it rained or was too humid to do anything. We played the games at night during sleepovers and sometimes when we came in at night, or even in the morning before we went out. The majority of our day was outside doing something with friends. No electronics other than a lame handheld baseball game or an Altered Beast wrist watch existed, and it was ages before any of us got a Game Boy. Not going out meant life was hell. Not going out AND not being allowed on video games was even worse.

If the behavior was severe, then the punishment got worse. ONE time I was caught stealing out of a Jamesway. I stuffed two handheld games down my pants. My stupid self OPENED the hard plastic package and took the game out. Then put the games in my pants above my butt crack. I thought for sure I was free and clear. Nope. Someone heard me crackling the plastic on TWO games from a mile away. Stupid me didn't remember that everyone else has ears. Hearing the opening of the packages, then probably seeing two game-less packs laying in the aisle, under everything else, and one can only assume the inevitable. Some guy who worked there told my mom and Grandma (Mom Mom) they had to check me. They had no clue why. They were shocked to find out I was guilty and the man took the games back inside and called it a day. I was ten-years-old and a horrible thief. My Mom and Grandma were embarrassed. They told my Dad about it at home. They agreed upon the only thing they rarely ever did. Three lashes with a belt is what they saved for serious things. It wasn't fun, that's for sure.

They barely gave me a few taps. It was like nothing, but the fact that it could have been worse is what struck fear into some kids. Not me of course, but it worked on most kids because no one wanted their weekend ruined by sitting inside while everyone was outside.

And now look where we are. The video below shows a teacher walking up to a student and the student beating the teacher. Why was someone recording this before the fight happened? Did the student plan to attack the teacher and they had their friend record it? Or did the teacher think the student was going to attack them, so they wanted it on video for evidence. There's more to this story that we don't know, but either way - whatever convinced this student that beating up a teacher was a good idea leads me to wonder if the student has parents who failed her.

Do parents fail their kids by becoming friends with their kids? Are today's parents too soft and lack discipline and structure at home? Did this stuff happen back in the day, but no one knew about it because we didn't have smart phones to record everything? Think about it - literally everything we do today is, or can be, recorded on multiple phones at any given time. No one really had that option back in the day. People could do all kinds of crazy things and nothing would get recorded. Then it was my word vs your word in court or arguments and there wasn't evidence of every little stupid thing we did as kids.

Watch the video and tell me what you think.

So what happened? What went wrong? Is this the fault of the parents who possibly failed to instill values into their daughter? Is this child unhinged to the point that she will break at any given moment? Does she have an abusive history? Did the teacher provoke this off-camera? If the teacher provoked it and drove the child to the point of no return, then can we really blame the child in this?

What needs to happen? How do we fix this? Can we fix this?

For every great student out there, there's probably going to be a few unruly ones. There will always be a balance. Maybe that's just how the world will be and the only reason it seems more obvious now is thanks to smart phones capturing everything on video.

The other option is parents start beating their kids. At the very least, strike some fear into kids and teach them to have respect for themselves and especially adults.

Something needs to be fixed, but what is it? How do we fix today's kids who have no respect for adults? Is it fixable or just a balance the world will always have?

UPDATE: After watching the video a few more times, I'm not sure if that's really a teacher. It's been uploaded all over the web and other sources say she's a teacher, but when she says she's "not getting suspended over you" - that makes me think it's actually another student. Maybe this student pushed another girl to the edge. Either way, this attack opens eyes to a bit more violence then we would like to see in schools and the question remains - how do we fix this?

What do we do?

Posted in Opinion and filed under family.