NJ Lawmakers pushing bill to ban paper and plastic bags


What are they doing now? Are they going to make New Jersey California again? Is NJ taking pointers from California with banning things?

New Jersey might be on the way to banning all plastic and paper bags. The ban will also include polystyrene containers and the lawmakers think this will help fix and address some of the environmental and public health issues from these items, as stated by WHYY.

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They're saying the discarded plastics get in the waterways and end up being ingested by both humans and marine life.

“When they get into your body, because you’re ingesting them, they also bring with them organic chemicals, some of which are carcinogenic,” said state Sen. Bob Smith, D-Middlesex. “This is a public health crisis.”

Where did this all come from? Well, this is all from a bill that's being pushed by the Senate Budget and Appropriations Committee who wants to ban the single-use bags, both plastic and paper, to be in effect after a one year period. They also want to ban containers, like the Styrofoam  ones, but that wouldn't go into effect for at least two years.

And don't you think for one moment that they forgot about straws. Their bills will also ban plastic straws, but there's an exception that allows customers to request a straw.

But critics said the legislation was unnecessary because of advances in recycling technology. Others decried one aspect of the new proposal that would force food retailers like grocery stores to give away reusable bags for free for the first two months of the ban. 

Michael DeLoreto, a lobbyist for the New Jersey Food Council, said some businesses would not recoup those costs for years.

“We just simply can’t support the concept of a bag giveaway with the definition of reusable bag as defined,” he said.

Governments are trending toward banning plastics and polystyrene. On Thursday, Philadelphia City Council moved one step closer to banning single-use plastic bags with a unanimous vote on an amended bill. 

In New Jersey alone, about 50 cities and towns have local ordinances regulating the use of single-use plastics.

Are they giving away multiple use bags? What happens if you're the type of customer who goes food shopping for a family of five and you need like 10 bags?

What happens if people start throwing these bags away too?


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