Rachel Dolezal changed her race, now she's changing her name

Rachel Dolezal, the white girl who thinks she is black, is changing her name. She unemployed and facing eviction, but she has time to worry about a name change. Makes perfect sense right?

Don't worry, Rachel. We know who you are. You're a white girl. Always will be. Doesn't matter how much makeup and bronzer you wear or what you change your name to, you're still a Caucasian.

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So far she's changed her race, changing her name, and I guess she will change her gender too. Maybe she'll go from being a white girl to a black guy. That would be hilarious!

So what's her new name? She plans to change names from Rachel Dolezal to Nkechi Amare Diallo. That's somehow the short version of Nkechinyere. The long version looks like the short version. Does anyone else notice that?

Would you believe that Nkechi Amare Diallo, short for Nkechinyere, originates from the Igbo language of Nigeria and means “what god has given” or “gift of god”?

You’d better believe it, because all of the above is true, according to The Daily Mail.

Dolezal, the former president of the NAACP’s Spokane, Washington chapter and a part-time professor of Africana Studies at Eastern Washington University, changed her name in October in a Washington state court.

Only days later, she initiated a Change.org petition under Nkechi Diallo to lobby TEDx to post her speech from April, 2016 at the University of Idaho. She didn’t mention her birth name, only posting, “Rachel Dolezal's TEDx Talk on Race & Identity . . . is still not available online. Please post her talk online immediately. She should not be censored due to her unique perspective. We want to watch this speech!”

The petition only garnered 30 signatures; 100 were needed to get TED to post the speech, but TED posted it anyway on its TED blog, writing:

TEDx organizers host events independent of TED, and they have the freedom to invite speakers they feel are relevant to their communities. These volunteers find thousands of new voices all over the world - many of which would not otherwise be heard - including some of our most beloved, well-known speakers, people like Brene Brown and Simon Sinek. What TEDx organizers have achieved collectively is remarkable. But, yes, some of them occasionally share ideas we don’t stand behind.

So Rachel only needed 100 signatures to get noticed by TED, but only received 30? You can literally get 100 people to comment on a picture of a slice of pizza on Facebook, but she couldn't get more than 30 for something legit? That's funny. I wonder how many signatures were her on a different email address.

I guess no one truly supports her in all of her falseness.

She's an insult to humanity.

I can't take people like her serious.

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